Complete List of Chair Publications

Please note: publications released during or after 2009 are available from Amazon.com.

Books

Vision and Prospects for World Peace (2013)
Hoda Mahmoudi

In this study, Hoda Mahmoudi addresses themes central to building a more peaceful world, including human nature and its capacity to mobilize for good and ill, the pace and scope of changes shaping global conditions, and the role of education in transforming not only individuals but also societies at large. First presented in November 2012 as the Inaugural Lecture of the Bahá’í Chair for World Peace, Vision and Prospects for World Peace shares a concept of peace-building called a “worldview approach.” “This approach,” writes Professor Mahmoudi, “moves beyond nationalism and particularism and instead embraces a global, or ‘globalizing,’ view of peace that significantly expands and enriches the prevailing, Western-oriented model of peace education.” Also included are introductory remarks by John Townshend, Kenneth Bowers, Dorothy Nelson, and Suheil Bushrui. View more information on this publication.

Retrieving Our Spiritual Heritage: Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Lectures and Essays, 1994-2005 (2012)
Suheil Bushrui

This is a selection of lectures and essays written by Suheil Bushrui during his tenure as holder of the Bahá'í Chair for World Peace. The themes covered are numerous and diverse, and include: the spiritual foundation of human rights, globalization and its impact on minority communities, values education at universities, spirituality and the environment, interfaith dialogue, intercultural exchange, reform of the United Nations, and the basic beliefs and tenets of the Bahá'í faith. Also included are a Foreword by John Townshend (dean of the University of Maryland’s College of Behavioral and Social Sciences) and an Introduction by John Grayzel (holder of the Bahá'í Chair from 2006 to 2011).

Human Security in an Insecure World (2012)
John Grayzel (Moderator & Commentator), Patrick Cronin, Kishan Minocha, Mishkat al-Moumin, Constance Newman (Discussants), Michael Dravis (Editor)

These Interactive Dialogue proceedings—based in part on a panel discussion held at the University of Maryland—address the emergence of a new doctrine of international relations known as “human security.”  While traditional national security focuses on the safety of states, human security is concerned with the wellbeing of individuals.  The Interactive Dialogue is presented together with explanatory notes, appendices, and an extensively annotated bibliography.

The Spiritual Heritage of the Human Race (2010)
Suheil Bushrui & Mehrdad Massoudi, with James Madaio, Michael Dravis, and Michael Russo

This book, a comprehensive survey of divine and non-divine spiritual traditions, is designed for an undergraduate audience. Each tradition is presented in its own right as an independent spiritual system of ideas and practices. At the same time, the material has been selected based on a perspective which posits the existence of a spiritual heritage common to all humanity. In this way, it is hoped that the text can serve as a foundation for interfaith studies and activities.

The Humanity of Diplomacy: People and Diplomacy in the Twenty-first Century (2009)
John Grayzel (Moderator), Suheil Bushrui, Badi Foster, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, Joseph Montville (Discussants), Michael Dravis (Editor)

The theme addressed by this Interactive Dialogue is how ordinary people can more actively and effectively contribute to official diplomacy. This topic was inspired by the history of the negotiations that culminated in the Treaty of Portsmouth, the 1905 agreement that ended the Russo-Japanese War. As the reader will discover, the insightful discussion among a panel with extensive diplomatic, academic, and conflict management experience provides significant insights. The Interactive Dialogue is presented together with explanatory notes, appendices, and bibliographies (including two annotated bibliographies).



Annual Lectures (pamphlets)

“More than Words: Harnessing the Power to Reorder Society”
Robert C. Henderson

The Eleventh Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland on 17 November 2005
There is a need for an "organizing vision" among humankind to break down the barriers caused by war, racial discrimination, extremes of wealth and poverty, and hatred. Only by such means will humanity achieve progress and the kind of restructuring of society which will result in global peace and socioeconomic justice for all. Across the world and in every culture, exemplary individuals and groups are working to achieve such goals.

“The Value of Values”
William E. Kirwan

The Tenth Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland on 14 April 2004
Questions of peace, conflict resolution, tolerance, values, and spirituality are of vital importance to colleges and universities. Educational institutions play a crucial role in society by training the next generation of leaders in all walks of life. Part of this training must be centered on ethics and values.

“Eternal Wisdom in an Age of Illusion: Reflections Upon a Pathway”
David Cadman

The Ninth Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland in April 2003
Professor Cadman’s paper discusses aspects of a concept known as the "perennial philosophy," with particular reference to how it can serve as a guide, or pathway, for the twenty-first century.

“Environmental Ethics and Public Policy”
Lord St. John of Bletso

The Eighth Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland on 31 May 2002
The extremist tactics sometimes adopted by the radical wing of the environmental movement should be rejected. Rather than frightening the public with dire predictions of doom, a far better approach is consensus building to encourage individuals, communities, corporations, and governments to adopt responsible stewardship over the environment and its resources.

“Indigenous Women's Perspectives on Unity”
Patricia Locke

The Seventh Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland in 2001
This text was delivered as the keynote address of the international conference "On the Advancement of Women and Men in a Global Civil Society." In her presentation, Ms. Locke spoke about the significant contributions that indigenous women have made to bring about the equality of women and men and the oneness of humankind.

“The Problems of Religious Liberty”
John Noonan, Jr.

The Sixth Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland in 2000
In America, the experience of religious liberty has been closely linked with the principle and practice of freedom of speech. The free exercise of religion has led to profound changes in American law—for example, abolition, temperance, and civil rights. The legal notion of religious liberty influenced revolutionary France and, later, the Catholic Church's Second Vatican Council.

“Religion, Conflict Resolution and the Role of Leadership”
Amine Gemayel, former President of Lebanon

The Fifth Annual Lecture of the Bahá'í Chair for World Peace, delivered at the University of Maryland in 1999
President Gemayel offers his vision of a world that can overcome conflict. He speaks of the imminent need for a "synthesis of religious tenets" as "an essential prerequisite for conflict resolution on a global scale," and states that "it is the spiritual dimension that governs humanity's conduct and behavior." He suggests that "the time has come for the creation of a new universal forum that draws together thinkers, philosophers, theologians, poets, and artists from several backgrounds and nations, great and small."

“Education, Values and Human Prosperity”
Professor Dwight Allen

The Fourth Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland in 1998
Education is the basis of social and intellectual life. Educational systems must be reformed to reflect the fact that we are now living in a global society. It must help us appreciate diversity and difference so that diversity becomes a source of attraction rather than a source of division and isolation.

“The United Nations at a Crossroads”
Techeste Ahderom

The Third Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland in 1997
Despite its flaws and shortcomings, the United Nations remains the leading institutional manifestation of world order. The U.N. must be reformed to reflect new global realities and the urgent need to actively promote and protect human rights.

“Alternative Forms of Conflict Resolution: A Pathway to Peace”
Dorothy Nelson

The Second Bahá'í Chair for World Peace Annual Lecture, delivered at the University of Maryland on 15 May 1995
The "adversary system" of conflict resolution, while an improvement over previous methods of solving disputes, continues to rely on the clash of vested interests and the emergence of a clear winner and a clear loser. A new era of human civilization calls for a new method that can be practiced on the local, national, and international levels. The key to a new system is inculcating a non-adversarial, consultative decision-making approach.

“Retrieving our Spiritual Heritage: A Challenge for Our Time”
Suheil Bushrui

The inaugural lecture of the Bahá'í Chair for World Peace, delivered at the University of Maryland on 3 March 1994
A crisis of values and the need for transformation call for a spiritual regeneration that transcends all racial, religious, and social barriers. From a "codification of the truths common to all religions, we can begin to work towards evolving a global code of ethics incorporating all that is best in mankind's spiritual heritage."
 

The Bahá'í Chair for World Peace
University of Maryland
1114 Chincoteague Hall
7401 Preinkert Drive
College Park, MD 20742

Copyright © 2017  University of Maryland

Phone 301-314-7714

Fax 301-314-9256

Email bcwp@umd.edu